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Sago Palm Tree

MMS021
1 Sheet
The Sago Palm Tree (Cycas revolute) is often called a “living fossil” because it is one of the most primitive seed plants alive today. Its origin traces back to ancient flora of the Mesozoic era more than 200 million years ago. It is easily recognizable due to its distinctive whorled feathery leaves.

Windmill

MMS038
2 Sheets
The term windmill derives from their use to mill grain. The first windmills appeared in Europe during the 12th century in northwestern France and southern England. At their peak of popularity some windmills were able to produce more than 1500 megawatts of power, a level not reached again until 1988.

Bird House

MMS039
1 Sheet

This bird house is modeled after a wren’s ideal home. Wrens aren't picky about their homes and will nest in small, plain houses. Just make sure the entry holes measure about 1 inch in diameter to let the wrens in and keep predators out.

Light House

MMS040
1 Sheet
A tower designed to emit light for marking dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, hidden reefs and also to help guide ships into safe harbors. Often these towers are cylindrical in order to avoid damage from strong winds.

Liberty Bell

MMS041
1 Sheet
Located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence. Upon the bell read the words "Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof." It weighs 2,080 pounds and is suspended from what is believed to be its original yoke, made of American elm.

Ferris Wheel

MMS044
2 Sheets
The first modern Ferris Wheel was designed and constructed by George Washington Ferris as a landmark for the 1893 Worlds Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The term Ferris wheel later came to be used generically for all such structures. As of 2012, the Singapore Flyer at 541 feet high is the world’s tallest wheel

Penny Farthing

MMS087
2 Sheets
This early bicycle design called the Penny-farthing was first produced about 1870. It used an enlarged front wheel instead of gears to create greater speed and a smoother ride. It was the first machine to be called a bicycle.

Vintage Movie Projector

MMS088
2 Sheets

Merry Go Round

MMS089
2 Sheets
A merry-go-round, is an amusement ride consisting of a rotating circular platform with seats for riders. The "seats" are traditionally in the form of rows of wooden horses or other animals mounted on posts, many of which are moved up and down by gearwork to simulate galloping, to the accompaniment of looped circus music.

Tyrannosaurus Rex Skeleton

MMS099
2 Sheets
The species Tyrannosaurus rex (rex meaning "king" in Latin), commonly abbreviated to T. rex, is one of the most well-represented of the large theropods. Tyrannosaurus was a bipedal carnivore with a massive skull balanced by a long, heavy tail. Relative to its large and powerful hind limbs, Tyrannosaurus fore limbs were short but unusually powerful for their size and had two clawed digits. It was among the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event.

Stegosaurus Skeleton

MMS100
2 Sheets
The stegosaurus was an armored dinosaur that lived about 150 million years ago. It had a heavily rounded back, short forelimbs, head held low to the ground and a stiffened tail held high in the air. The double plates along its back were most likely used for defense and may also have regulated its temperature. Stegosaurus weighed about 6,800 pounds and was 9 feet tall.

Triceratops Skeleton

MMS101
2 Sheets
The name from Greek means 3 horned face. This dinosaur was about 30 feet long, 10 feet tall and weighed 4 to 6 tons. Stout limbs supported its girth but it was unlikely the dinosaur could move very quickly. Like a modern-day rhinoceros, it probably spent much of its time grazing on plant matter.